Kondo, Anette


Annette Kondo is the Communications Director of the The Wilderness Society. The Wilderness Society advocates for all Americans who cherish wilderness and the natural world. Their goal is to ensure that future generations will enjoy, as we do today, the clean air and water, wildlife, beauty and opportunities for recreation and renewal that pristine forests, rivers, deserts and mountains provide.

Sen. Feinstein Introduces Legislation to Protect Vast Swaths of California Desert

By Annette Kondo
The Wilderness Society

Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) introduced legislation on Monday to preserve the spectacular heritage of the California desert by creating two new National Monuments and expanding Joshua Tree and Death Valley National Parks and the Mojave National Preserve.

The bill would establish new wilderness areas in Death Valley National Park and on lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the US Forest Service. Finally, the legislation would also establish a permitting process for all renewable energy projects on BLM land.

The legislation, the California Desert Protection Act of 2010, will preserve nearly 1.5 million acres of federal public lands that are essential for recreation, wildlife habitat and water resources. The Act will also safeguard historic trails and Native American cultural areas. 

Preserving California’s Public Lands To Buffer Global Warming’s Effects

kondo2.jpgAnette Kondo
Communications Director - California/ Nevada Region
The Wilderness Society

The White House release Tuesday of “Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States” forecasts a dim future for California if action is not taken immediately.

The report predicts extended droughts that threaten water supplies, higher temperatures that will exacerbate life-threatening air pollution and loss of unique plant and animal species in California”s “biodiversity hotspot,” one of just 34 such regions in the world.

Impacts to the state include:

• Sierra snowpack could decline 40 to 90 percent, with cascading effects on winter recreation, water supply, and natural ecosystems.