Reznik, Bruce


Bruce Reznik is the Executive Director of the Planning and Conservation League (PCL), who partners with hundreds of California environmental organizations to provide an effective voice in Sacramento for sound planning and responsible environmental policy at the state level.

Conservationists Beat Back Attack on CEQA

By Bruce Reznik

Planning & Conservation League

Conservation groups are hailing Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg for preventing a last-minute attempt to gut the California Environmental Quality Act from moving forward. State Senator Michael Rubio tried to sneak drastic changes to CEQA through the legislature using the infamous “gut-and-amend” procedure.

Senator Rubio’s legislation, known as SB 317, would have made comprehensive changes to CEQA without giving the legislature – and the public – an opportunity to explore what these changes would mean to environmental quality in the state.

Clinton Targets Short-Lived Pollutants as Drivers of Climate Change

By Bruce Reznik
Planning and Conservation League

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton recently announced a joint, six-nation climate change effort to reduce air pollutants. The freshly christened Climate and Clean Air Coalition, consisting of delegates from Mexico, Canada, Sweden, Bangladesh, Ghana, and the United States, met in Washington to detail measures that will curb emissions of pollutants such as black carbon soot and methane, so-called “short-lived” climate pollutants because they dissipate in the atmosphere much faster than their long lingering cousin carbon dioxide.

How Environmental Protection Fares in Governor's Budget

By Bruce Reznik
Planning & Conservation League

Last week, due to a technical glitch, the Brown Administration unintentionally released the Governor’s proposed budget a few days earlier than expected. Through $10.3 billion in cuts and increased revenues, the proposed budget would close a $9.2 billion deficit, compared to last year's $26 billion gap, and build a $1.1 billion reserve. The most severe cuts will be inflicted on CalWORKs, Medi-Cal, child care, and the Cal Grant Program. The budget is contingent on voters approving a temporary increase in the sales tax and a higher levy on wealthy residents. If voters reject the ballot initiative in November, the state would be forced to cut another $4.8 billion from schools and community colleges; a cut equivalent to 3 weeks of instruction. ‘Trigger cuts’, as they’re called, would also strip funds from courts, public safety officers and flood protection.

New Study Reveals California Has Enough Housing to Meet Demand for More Than Two Decades

By Bruce Reznik
Planning and Conservation League

Last week, the Urban Land Institute (ULI) released a study detailing how California’s four largest metropolitan areas (Sacramento, Bay Area, Southern California and San Diego), which make up 80 percent of the state’s population, are seeing a trend in locational demands for housing. The dream of owning a home out in the suburbs seems to be shifting as young professionals, and those entering the workforce, care more about living in close proximity to areas served by mass transit, with better access to goods, services and their employment. 

Top CEQA Experts Examine Its Past And Debate Its Future

By Bruce Reznik
Planning & Conservation League

On Friday, November 4th, the UC Davis School of Law hosted “CEQA at 40: A Look Back and Forward”. Featuring panelists from all three branches of government, environmental attorneys, developers, academics and students, lively discussions ensued around one of the nation’s most important environment protection laws. Featured panels focused on the first forty years of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), including: the stories behind its passage; how the law has evolved since 1970; and how its protections compare to those in the federal National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) and other ‘little-NEPA’ statues across the nation and across nations. Just as importantly, panels focused on CEQA in the years to come.

Solar Careers: Revitalizing The Hope For New Job Creation in California

By Bruce Reznik
Planning and Conservation League

Yesterday, The Solar Foundation released its “National Solar Jobs Census 2011 Report.” The new study found that one in four solar energy jobs in the United States are held by Californians; and that nationwide, clean tech jobs are on the rise. With 25,575 of the 100,237 solar-related jobs nationwide, California leads the pack and holds four times as many positions as the runner- up, Colorado with 6,186 solar jobs recorded last year.

2011 Legislative Wrap-Up: Big Wins For The Environment; a Few Veto Casualties

By Bruce Reznik
Planning and Conservation League

Sunday night, the 2011 legislative session officially came to a close at midnight. The highly anticipated first year of Governor Brown’s new term has yielded new laws to protect public health from polluted drinking water, lead, and BPA in baby products. Brown signed legislation designed to curtail the immensely controversial practice of “shark finning” and well as legislation to protect California’s precious State Parks from closure. Overall, Governor Brown had an excellent record of signing strong environmental bills into law; a few such measures, however, fell victim to the Governor’s veto pen.

Brown Signs Controversial CEQA Bills Among Fanfare…and Dissent

By Bruce Resnik
Planning and Conservation League

Last week, at the Los Angeles Convention Center, Governor Jerry Brown signed two bills with the aim of streamlining the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA).  One of the bills, SB 292 (Padilla) provides preferential treatment for the construction of an NFL stadium in downtown Los Angeles. In exchange for developer AEG committing to certain mitigation measures up-front, any CEQA challenge to the project would bypass the traditional route of Superior Court. Such a challenge would instead go directly to the Court of Appeals, which would then have 175 days to render a final decision. AB 900 (Buchanan) would provide similar judicial streamlining to massive ($100M+) infrastructure projects that the Governor signs off on.