Abdullah, Khalil


Khalil Abdullah reports for New America Media, the country's first and largest national collaboration and advocate of 2,000 ethnic news organizations.

Voter Photo ID Laws Have Harsh Impact on Poor, Elderly and Minority Voters, Study Says

By Khalil Abdullah
New America Media

If no one provides him with a ride, Jose Zuniga, 83-years old and wheelchair-bound, would have to take two or three buses and travel 20 miles to reach the nearest south Texas government office that could issue the new photo ID he will need to vote in upcoming elections.

Zuniga is one of a particular sub-set of an estimated 500,000 eligible voters in 10 states who could be negatively affected by stricter photo ID laws. They do not own a car nor do they drive. They live more than 10 miles away from a state office that can issue the ID required to vote and that would be considered a fulltime facility, that is, one that is open more than two days a week.

In Texas alone, close to 13 percent, or nearly two million, of the state’s voting–age citizens live more than 10 miles from the nearest state office that can issue a voter ID.

Voter IDs: The ‘Hanging Chads’ of 2012

By Khalil Abdullah
New America Media

A gathering of activists, journalists and voting rights advocates met recently to discuss the growing number of states that have adopted what many see as discriminatory voter registration laws. Such policies, they argue, do more to limit rather than expand democracy, threatening to disenfranchise millions in the lead up to the November elections.

Citizen journalist Faye Anderson was among those gathered at last week’s symposium, hosted by the Center for American Progress. Taking aim at new regulations in several states that require voters to show photo ID, she equated the law to the controversy hanging over the 2000 presidential race.

The regulation, she says, will be the “hanging chads” of the 2012 election.

Foreclosure Crisis Compels Increased HUD Funding

By Khalil Abdullah
New America Media

WASHINGTON, D.C. – President Obama did not mention America’s foreclosure crisis during his year-end press conference. But the next day, Dec. 23, U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan held his own teleconference to announce the award of close to $73 million in counseling grants.

The grants are supposed to fund counseling services to assist first-time homebuyers. But Donovan stressed they are also to help homeowners facing foreclosure. He said that homeowners who receive counseling are “twice as likely to receive [loan] modification and stay out of default” than those who do not.