Dev, Rupa


Rupa Dev is a reporter and associate editor for New America Media. She has worked in NAM's communication department, youth program, and on the education beat. Previously, she was an associate editor for The Cultural Connect and assistant editor for Nirvana Woman magazine.

Meet the Candidates: California Superintendent of Schools

By Rupa Dev
New America Media

Given the mess California schools are in, what are your top three priorities as state superintendent of public instruction?—Rupa Dev, New America Media

Tom Torlakson:
Stabilizing the budget: The legislature and governor have abandoned education as the top priority it once was. About $11 billion is owed to schools, and we need to return money back.

Accountability: We need to bring school boards, school administrations, teachers, and parents together to create a better system of measuring school success. For example, if a teacher is identified as not effective, can mentoring and professional development improve the teacher? If not, how do we hold the school accountable to move that teacher out of the profession?

Survey Shows How California Schools are Coping with Budget Cut Pains

By Rupa Dev
New America Media

Faced with budget cuts, K-12 public schools in California are grappling with terrible choices about what should get the ax. A new survey of almost 400 schools finds the cuts over the last two years were felt everywhere from grounds upkeep to instructional material to school nurses.

The online survey, administered by the California Department of Education, asked administrators in county offices of education, school districts, and charter schools about how they balanced their budgets in light of state budget cuts to public education.

Californians Say Don't Cut Our Schools

By Rupa Dev
New America Media

An overwhelming majority of Californians think not enough state funding is going to their public schools and that K-12 education is the area they most want to protect from spending cuts, according to a recent survey.

“Californians and Education,” an annual survey released by the Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC), found 62 percent of Californians polled who think their local schools aren’t receiving enough state funding. That’s a 10 percent increase from last year’s survey.