Rusch, Emily


Emily Rusch is the State Director of CALPIRG, the California Public Interest Research Group, a statewide consumer group that stands up to powerful interests.

Earthquake Near Virginia Nuclear Reactors Is a Reminder of the Risks in California

By Emily Rusch
CALPIRG

Tuesday’s earthquake in Virginia, which shut down two nuclear reactors less than 10 miles away, is a jolting reminder of exactly the type of unpredictable risk that threaten the safety and security of nuclear power plants here in California and across the country.

Because of the immediate, serious danger if radioactivity were to be released, Governor Brown should be moving California away from this inherently dangerous technology and towards safer energy sources.

Principles for High-Speed Rail Public-Private Partnerships

By Emily Rusch
CALPIRG Education Fund

As California prepares to start laying the first tracks for high-speed rail in 2012, a new report by CALPIRG Education Fund outlines the promise and pitfalls to avoid as California considers new public-private partnerships to complete our high-speed rail project.

While many in Congress are having trouble finding money to invest in high-speed rail, we must always remember the costs of not moving forward. Without high-speed rail, we will be more dependent on oil and will pay dearly to build more airport runways and ever-wider highways. For these reasons, among others, high-speed rail makes financial, economic, and environmental sense for California.

On Corporate Tax Breaks Bill, Governor Gets Facts Wrong

By Emily Rusch
CALPIRG
 
Governor Schwarzenegger vetoed AB 2666 (Skinner) Wednesday evening, a bill sponsored by CALPIRG and the California Labor Federation, that would have made corporate tax breaks more transparent. The measure called for the state to disclose who gets corporate tax breaks and how much they get. 

Unfortunately the veto message entangled truth with myth. The governor’s veto message states: “The Franchise Tax Board and the Department of Finance already publish annual reports detailing all tax expenditures, their cost, their intended benefit and other useful information.”

Stop the Ticketmaster Merger

By Emily Rusch
CALPIRG

They already dominate ticket sales so much that it’s hard to believe, but Ticketmaster could get even bigger.

In late December, the British Department of Justice gave their stamp of approval to the proposed merger between Ticketmaster and Live Nation. Now the companies are pressuring the United State Department of Justice to disregard antitrust laws and do the same.  

Ticketmaster’s fees are already extreme – often as much as 30 percent of the overall price of a ticket. In a report by the Washington Post, Ticketmaster added $16.60 in fees -- $4.10 for "processing," $3.50 for "facilities," and a $9 "convenience charge" -- to a $56 dollar ticket.