Finamore, Carl


Carl Finamore currently works for Beyond Chron. He was also a UAL baggage handler at SFO and former President (ret), Air Transport Employees, Local Lodge 1781, AFL-CIO.

Getting Healthy at Work: Who Do You Trust?

By Carl Finamore

Around 150 million Americans drag themselves out of bed each day and show up for work. You get your first cup of coffee, chit-chat a bit, punch in, and settle in for a long day on the job. But don't get too settled, because you might be asked to answer a few questions about your family medical history, your sexual orientation, and your use of tobacco, drugs, and alcohol. You also might be asked to take a blood test, have your cholesterol and blood pressure recorded, and get your body mass index checked. Only a few years ago, such probing, pricking, and pinching would only occur in the privacy of a doctor's office, but now these procedures are becoming more commonly prescribed in over half of American workplaces. And such "wellness" programs are growing rapidly.

Cairo - One Day After Mubarak

By Carl Finamore
Beyond Chron

I arrived at a nearly empty Cairo airport one day after President Hosni Mubarak resigned, an act thought unthinkable only 18 days ago. Over one million tourists left Egypt in the last week according to the country's press reports, so the hotels and streets were empty of visitors. I myself, was eager to see how a people's movement actually was able to forge such a powerful movement in such a short span of time. I was excited and exhilarated to be here.

I passed the presidential palace while on my way to downtown Cairo and heard the constant car horn honking by passing motorists celebrating Mubarak's departure. This gave me my first indication that I was entering a city super-charged with confidence and enthusiasm. I would see the same excitement throughout the streets of Cairo on my first day.

“We Are Furious,” Say United Flight Attendants



By Carl Finamore

Beyond Chron

Pioneering women at United Airlines (UAL) organized the world’s first Flight Attendant (FA) union in 1945. They were quickly recognized by the carrier as the official bargaining representative when the CEO said “they need a union.” Today, these same workers stand last as the lowest paid among all the major airlines and are hardly getting any notice from management. Negotiations have stalled.

“We are working at 1994-wage levels after suffering wage cuts, staff reductions and rising health care costs,” Chris Black told several hundred flight attendants and other union supporters picketing on January 8 at UAL departure gates at San Francisco International Airport (SFO).