Goldstein, Brian


A New Year and New Opportunity for Policy Reform in California

author Brian GoldsteinBy Brian Goldstein

Center for Juvenile & Criminal Justice

2013 proved to be a significant year for criminal and juvenile justice reform in California. Landmark legislation was passed in SB 260 (Hancock), allowing individuals to petition for a resentencing hearing after serving at least 15 years of a life sentence for an offense committed while a youth. The state also passed AB 218 (Dickinson) that addressed employment discrimination for justice-involved individuals. This policy provides formerly incarcerated individuals a second chance at success during reentry. With the beginning of 2014 just around the corner, it is important to reflect on these successes and the need for continued work in the New Year.

Civil Immigration Detention is Not an Appropriate Use of Local Jails

By Brian Goldstein

Center on Juvenile & Criminal Justice

Should federal immigration enforcement consume finite local public safety resources and capacity? As California mulls this question, consider that Governor Brown is expanding the state’s reliance on private prison as a last minute solution to federal mandates, while some county sheriffs request jail construction funding to overhaul local facilities. Now is not the time for California’s local jails to unnecessarily hold those suspected of violating civil immigration laws.

Shutting Down the School-To-Jailhouse Pipeline in California

Brian GoldsteinBy Brian Goldstein

Center on Juvenile & Criminal Justice

On December 14, 2012 Adam Lanza killed 20 children and six adults at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn. Six months later, this incident remains seared in the nation’s consciousness. The tragedy at Sandy Hook joined the unfortunate list of other school shootings, like those at Virginia Tech and Columbine High School.

As Americans struggled to make sense of the tragedy, advocacy groups and policymakers in all levels of government developed political solutions they thought necessary to prevent this from happening again.

An Uncertain Future for California’s Higher Education

By Brian Goldstein
Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice

California is home to one of the finest higher education systems in the world; a catalyst for innovation, job creation, and academic excellence. This includes the California Community Colleges, California State University (CSU), and University of California (UC) systems. Higher education funds represent a long-term investment that accrues dividends beyond the classroom.  

On May 14, Governor Brown released his revised 2012-13 budget that outlined measures to fill an estimated $15.7 billion deficit. Given this fiscal crisis, state higher education must absorb funding reductions. Each must also prepare for potential future cuts if voters reject Governor Brown’s November tax initiative.  

The Not-So-Shared Sacrifice of Californians

By Brian Goldstein
Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice

Escalating state budget deficits were revealed in California Governor Brown’s state 2012-13 May Revised Budget released May 14. This requires shared sacrifice in the form of additional cuts to state services, a theme previously articulated by the Governor. In December 2011, Governor Brown announced in Latin, “Nemo dat non habet,” which he translated to “No man gives what he does not have.” At the time, he used this expression to belie the severity of California’s fiscal crisis and the inevitable action required to plug the estimated $2.2 billion revenue shortfall.