California Budget Deficit Requires Balanced Approach


Posted on 19 May 2012

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By Assemblymember Bob Blumenfield

SACRAMENTO – In this Democratic weekly radio address, Assemblymember Bob Blumenfield (D-San Fernando Valley) discusses the California budget deficit and Governor Jerry Brown’s recently revised budget proposal. Blumenfield, Chair of the Assembly Budget Committee, notes that a slow recovery and court decisions blocking previous cuts have contributed to the $16 billion deficit. Blumenfield also points to the need for Californians to pair new revenues with the cuts that must be made.

This week’s English language address is 2:05
http://www.asmdc.org/audio/20120518RadioAddressEnglishBlumenfieldMayRevise.MP3

This week’s Spanish language address is 3:38.
http://www.asmdc.org/audio/20120518RadioAddressBlumenfieldMayRevisedBudgetSpanish.MP3

Website of Assembly Assemblymember Bob Blumenfield: www.asmdc.org/blumenfield

Transcript:

Hello, this is Assembly Budget Chair Bob Blumenfield of the San Fernando Valley with an important update about your state budget.

This week, Governor Jerry Brown released a revised budget proposal that includes some sobering news for all of us about what it’s going to take to put California’s finances back on track.

We now know that our budget situation has deteriorated despite last year’s cuts that eliminated 60% of our state’s long term budget imbalance.  Our state treasury is now nearly 16 billion dollars in deficit.

This figure is partially the result of California’s economy that, while improving, is not recovering as strongly as we anticipated.  In addition, various lawsuits have overturned some of the cuts that we adopted last year.

The Governor’s roadmap for balancing the state’s books includes some stark options and tough choices.  After years of cutting the budget, our options are limited to close a deficit of this size.  Few are simple and virtually none are pain free.

The Governor’s plan is mixture of cuts for the Legislature to approve and an appeal to you – the voters – to support temporary revenues on the November ballot.  The alternative is that the state budget is balanced by cuts alone and that will devastate our schools, health care, and public safety.

Over the next month, the Legislature will publicly vet the Governor’s proposal and deliver a responsible, on time budget by June 15th.  Our actions will ensure that we have a viable state budget no matter what happens at the November ballot and that the public can help shape the budget choices coming in the fall.

So far, the Assembly has held over 60 budget hearings and we will continue to preside over an open process when reviewing and acting on the budget over the next month.

Our focus is to create a responsible budget in synch with the values of Californians.  To do that, the Legislature must make tough cuts and the voters must approve temporary revenues in November.

This has been Assemblymember Bob Blumenfield from the San Fernando Valley.  Thank you very much for listening.

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Assemblymember Bob Blumenfield represents California's 40th District and is Chair of the Assembly Budget Committee.

No more cuts or voters will cut you off come election time. Capitol must instead raise revenues by taxing the rich. It is about time that they pay their fair share of taxes rather than putting this in the backs of already financially stressed middle class workers and tax-paying poor.

(A fair)Share of taxes is the right way to go.

Liberals say that you can't make anymore cuts and you must raise revenue. They say it so often that most people believe that the $17 billion deficit really exists. It doesn't...it's simply a compilation of the wish lists from education, prison guards, etc. No performance audit is ever ordered.Just putting a ceiling ($75,000 is a good figure) on all public salaries could save billions without any child or poor person suffering.They could get the same-- or better programs-- but the people who provide the services would get less.